2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid is the world’s first hybrid plugin minivan

The Pacifica Hybrid will be appealing enough for families and others who like the utility, capacity, and ease of entry that minivans offer, but it’s also good as an electric vehicle.

The 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid wraps a number of firsts into one innovative package.

The Pacifica minivan, launched this year, has received positive reviews for its combination of stylish design, comfortable interior, easy-to-use infotainment, and capacious carrying capacity for up to eight adults and their goods.

Despite its name, the Pacifica Hybrid is a plug-in hybrid with a 16-kilowatt-hour battery pack that gives it an estimated EPA-rated electric range of 30 miles. That makes it the world’s first plug-in hybrid minivan.

The combination of an seven-seat vehicle with usable electric range will be appealing enough for families and others who like the utility, capacity, and ease of entry that minivans offer.

But the Pacifica Hybrid is also good as an electric vehicle, with strong enough electric power that it doesn’t kick on its engine at the merest provocation, as do lower-range plug-in hybrids from luxury makers like BMW and Mercedes-Benz.

We tried hard to get the vehicle into this year’s Green Car Reports Best Car To Buy award competition, but Chrysler’s embargo on driving impressions (today) missed our deadline for the award by exactly one day.

Getting behind the wheel of the plug-in hybrid Pacifica, very little is changed from the conventional version that is now appearing on U.S. roads.

Slightly different frontal styling and a charge port on the left-front fender are about the only clues to the electrified minivan’s very different powertrain.

And Fiat Chrysler, whose CEO has long trumpeted his irritation at having to produce zero-emission vehicles to stay legal in California, has produced a remarkably good plug-in hybrid for its first effort.

The company’s philosophy is that this is a powertrain option, not a lifestyle, and so it’s relatively simplified.

This explains, among other things, the choice of name: “hybrid” is a familiar term that translates to better energy efficiency, whereas “plug-in hybrid” will likely be confusing to family-vehicle buyers of the sort who don’t read sites like this one.

Starting off with a charged battery, the Pacifica Hybrid defaults to all-electric operation—though unlike the Prius Prime, it will kick on the engine when full throttle is needed (and keep it on for long enough to warm up the emission-control system).

In a variety of drive routes and conditions among three different High Gear Media editors, we found the plug-in minivan to be a capable performer on electricity alone.

It’s hardly Tesla-fast, but in local use and even on highways up to about 70 mph, it will stay in all-electric mode and most likely deliver its rated 30 miles of electric range. (We haven’t yet tested it in winter weather, however.)

In mixed driving conditions, including lots of up- and downhill stretches, we saw 32 miles before the battery was depleted. In the right conditions, we might expect as much as 35 miles of electric range.

The accelerator is linear and easy to modulate, and we found the braking good: progressive and without any annoying regenerative traits. Switching from all-electric to hybrid mode was smooth, seamless, and shudder-free.

A “low” setting increases the regeneration, but it’s nowhere near as strong as the BMW i3, Chevy Bolt EV or Volt, or any Tesla model.

There’s no Volt-style increase in regenerative braking on demand, which means one-pedal driving would be close to impossible. Nor is there an “EV only” mode or an option to conserve battery charge for later use.

Asked about this, Chrysler engineers essentially said they’d wanted to keep the driving experience as familiar as possible, since they felt a large number of Pacifica Hybrid buyers would likely be new to hybrids and plug-in vehicles.

Given its first-in-the-segment position, that’s not an unreasonable assumption, we think.

The “easy and understandable” approach extends to the instrumentation, which is standard Pacifica with a few additions: an energy tab on the center touchscreen that shows energy flow, and a powertrain display between the gauges.

On the road, the ride is smooth and the roadholding is good. Even the standard Pacifica is a large vehicle, and the added 650 pounds of the hybrid version—with the battery mounted below the second-row passengers’ feet—keeps it firmly planted in turns.

Recharging the 16-kwh battery takes 2 hours with a 240-volt Level 2 charging station, or about 14 hours on a standard 120-volt household circuit. The onboard charger is rated at 6.6 kilowatts.

Once the battery was empty, in mixed driving with considerable traffic, we averaged 28 miles per gallon. Final EPA ratings aren’t out yet, though the non-hybrid version comes in at 22 mpg combined.

Chrysler estimates an efficiency of 80 MPGe when running electrically, although that’s for the city portion of the test and not the combined number. (Miles Per Gallon Equivalent, or MPGe, is a measure of how far a vehicle can travel electrically on the same amount of energy as contained in 1 gallon of gasoline.)

Obviously driving style, speed, and traffic conditions will vary that result considerably.

It’s worth noting that while the third-row seat in the Pacifica Hybrid still folds flat into its compartment below the floor, the second row no longer does—because Chrysler’s “Stow-N-Go” bin for the rear seat is now occupied by the battery.

On the other hand, that gives second-row riders more comfortable seats with thicker and plusher upholstery than those designed to fold into the floor.

The two pieces of the rear seat are removable for maximum cargo capacity, weighing about 60 pounds apiece.

The majority of 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrids are likely to be the Platinum modelstarting at $44,995, its maker says, though the Premium base version starts at $41,995. Both prices are before the mandatory destination fee.

All Pacifica Hybrids qualify for the full $7,500 federal income-tax credit for purchase of a plug-in vehicle, and a $1,500 purchase rebate in California plus “green sticker” single-occupant access to that state’s highway carpool lanes.

Chrysler offers a 15-year, 150,000-mile warranty on all emission-related equipment and a 10-year, 150,000-mile warranty on the battery (against failure, not against capacity degradation).

The 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid will go on sale later this year, and arrive in dealerships in volume early next year. It will be distributed nationally.

EDITOR’S NOTE: An earlier version of this article referred to the Pacifica Hybrid as an “eight-seat” vehicle. While a version of the conventional Pacifica is available with a three-position second row, the hybrid model comes only with captain’s chairs in the second row, which are standard for its two upper-level trim options. We thank reader Sopfu for the correction and apologize for the error.

 

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A first look at the new Chrysler Pacifica minivan

THINKING INSIDE THE BOX: Chrysler’s Pacifica is another step forward in the evolution of the minivan.

Chrysler created the minivan segment, but the automotive industry is a “What have you done for me lately?” business.

In Chrysler’s case—actually FCA nowadays—they’ve redesigned the minivan from the ground up and revived the Pacifica name for a brand-new 2017 minivan.

Somewhere along the line, the terms “soccer mom” and “minivan”—two positives—got turned into a single negative.

The truth is that minivans are unmatched for versatility, seating comfort, and being a “family room” on wheels for trips.

If I had a young family, there’s no question that a minivan would be my vehicle of choice.

FCA North America Eastern PR guru Lisa Barrow, Pacifica PR manager Angela Bianchi, and Pacifica marketing head Matt McAlear visited the New England Motor Press Assn. on June 14 with a mini-fleet of the new minivans.

NEMPA members had the opportunity to crawl through the vehicles, drive them on local roads and interstates, and hear a presentation from McAlear.

Why the Pacifica name?

“We wanted a fresh start,” says McAlear. “Our research showed the Pacifica name had positive recognition. Reviving that was a lot less expensive than starting out fresh and establishing a new brand name.”

Still, Chrysler has expended some marketing energy, creating a series of ads with comedian Jim Gaffigan as a “dufus” dad demonstrating the Pacifica’s features via inane antics. Another ad features Brooklyn Decker being taught the Pacifica’s ropes by equally irritating know-it-all kids.

It was about the time that McAlear was demonstrating the fold-flat, Stow ‘n Go second- and third-row seats that Jamie Paige Deaton, Auto Editor at US News, pulled out her own child seat to test the second row.

MARKETING MINIVANS: Chrysler’s Matt McAlear sees the minivan segment as continuing to be attractive and profitable.
MARKETING MINIVANS: Chrysler’s Matt McAlear sees the minivan segment as continuing to be attractive and profitable.

Bill Griffith

FCA says a second-row seat can tilt forward, even with a child’s seat attached, to allow easy access to the third row.

There is a “don’t try this with a child strapped into the seat” caveat involved.

Deaton demonstrated that the system works.

Fortunately for demonstration purposes, said car seat was filled with crumbs and some candy smudges that were transferred to the Pacifica’s second-row leather seat.

That was an opportunity to test the onboard vacuum with its 12-foot stretch hose (and additional 12-foot attachment in case you want to clean another of the family vehicles in the process) to suck up the detritus.

McAlear had noted that all Pacifica trim levels have the same power train—an upgraded 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 that produces best-in-class horsepower (287) and torque (262 lb.-ft.), 28 mpg highway fuel economy, and is mated to a smooth 9-speed automatic transmission.

That means you pay for added features, with base models starting in the mid-20’s and top ones going into the low $40s. Top safety systems like autonomous braking and forward collision warning, lane-keeping assist, and rear park assist (with bump prevention) are available.

We liked the triple panoramic sunroof on the high-end version. But the Stow ‘n Go seating that allows both second- and third-row seats to fold flat is handy, too.

“You can carry 64 sheets of 4×8 plywood (1/4 inch) or 32 sheets of ½ inch,” says McAlear. “and unlike in a pickup truck, you can keep the wood dry on a rainy day.”

Driving a Pacifica for several additional days, we achieved the 28 mph highway claim—at least the onboard computer credited us with 28.4 mpg.

As for the notion that the minivan segment is fading away, McAlear thinks otherwise.

“Ten years ago, 17 models were selling about 1 million minivans a year,” he says. “Today a half-dozen of us are selling 500,000. That’s still a very viable market.”

The Pacifica’s infotainment screen arguably is the most user-friendly on the market.

And the available second-row DVR screens offer young ‘uns a variety of apps (games) and viewing options.

My grandson discovered one the next morning: The “Are we there yet?” feature.

We were driving from Connecticut to Newburyport, MA, and plugged the route into the Nav system.

From the rear seat, he could monitor our progress.

“Awesome,” he said.

That seems to be the early verdict on the Pacifica, too.

It’s Show Time

There are shows all over the area today. Here are some of the bigger ones:

Amesbury. This downtown show (9 a.m.-2 p.m.) also displays cars in the Millyard restoration area. Proceeds go to the coming Carriagetown Museum celebrating Amesbury’s history in carriage building and early automaking.

Elm Bank. The show outgrew its Wellesley estate site and is moving to a larger venue at 45 Hospital Road in Medfield. This 14th annual show will be judged in more than 30 classes and annually draws 800 vehicles.

Cape Cod. The Falmouth Classic Car Club has the first of its three annual events today (10-2) at Marine Park on Scranton Avenue.

Brookline. It’s British Car Day from 10-2 at Larz Anderson Auto Museum.

Epping, N.H. The Orientals Hot Rod Club (est. 1957) is having the New England Hot Rod Hall of Fame event and show today at New England Dragway.

Next week: Thursday, the Heritage Museums and Gardens and Museums in Sandwich goes “Under the Hood” from 6-7:30 p.m. with collector Jack Rosen talking about the collecting lifestyle and building his 2002 Can-Am race car. Contact Julie Raynor at 508-888-3300 x175.

Finally, next weekend (July 2-4) is the traditional Cars of Summer show at Green Hill Park in Worcester. Details at carsofsummer.com.

A first look at the new Chrysler Pacifica minivan

Brand-by-Brand Guide to Car Infotainment Systems

Our subscribers get real about their infotainment systems, which can be technological marvels that make driving a dream, or so difficult to use that they’re downright infuriating

The Standout

Fiat-Chrysler Uconnect 8.4: 70 percent very satisfied
Its straightforward touch-screen design, combined with a few traditional knobs and buttons, helps make Chrysler’s Uconnect 8.4 infotainment system a favorite with consumers. Satisfaction with Bluetooth and voice commands—often sore spots with drivers—ranked highly. Don’t confuse the 8.4 with Chrysler’s lesser Uconnect systems, which have smaller screens, less capability, and a much lower satisfaction rating of 49 percent. With an infotainment system this good, it’s too bad very few Chrysler models are recommended by Consumer Reports.


Very Good Systems

Hyundai Blue Link: 63 percent very satisfied
Hyundai specializes in making intuitive systems. A 2015 Hyundai Sonata owner says he’s “amazed at how easy it works.” Other owners appreciated that the Genesis incorporates both a touch screen and controller knob. Hyundai’s quick-to-learn voice command and Bluetooth systems rank highest for owner satisfaction.

 



BMW iDrive: 60 percent very satisfied
BMW’s iDrive employs a console-mounted controller knob, although the latest version adds a touch screen and is easier to use than earlier iterations. Still, mastering iDrive takes some time. It’s super-reliable, with good Bluetooth connectivity. Owner satisfaction with Bluetooth and call quality is very high, as is the system’s thoroughness: “It is very comprehensive and tells me everything about my vehicle,” an owner says. An X3 owner added, “The learning curve is fairly steep, but the system is not bad once you get the hang of it.”

 



GM (Chevrolet, Buick, GMC) MyLink/IntelliLink: 57 percent very satisfied
These high-ranked systems from Chevrolet, Buick, and GMC closely mirror Chrysler’s design. Screens are intuitive, most fonts are large, and there are multiple traditional knobs and buttons. Steering-wheel remote controls are comprehensive. Owners generally like using the OnStar system, which can call a live GM concierge for roadside assistance or to download directions straight to the navigation system.

 



Kia Uvo: 57 percent very satisfied
Like sister company Hyundai, Kia has infotainment systems that use knobs and buttons along with a touch screen. We suggest splurging for the optional navigation system’s larger screen; a 2016 Sorento owner complains that the basic screen “is way too small, and the messages on it are even smaller.”

 



Audi MMI: 57 percent very satisfied
MMI uses a controller knob, buttons, and a screen. The system is complex, but many agreed with the 2013 Q5 owner who said it “takes getting used to. Once mastered is intuitive.” The latest Audis feature the optional Virtual Cockpit—which replaces normal instrument gauges with a big digital screen that can display Google Maps and phone calls straight ahead of the driver.

 



Lexus Remote Touch: 56 percent very satisfied
This system uses a trackpad or mouselike joystick, and a high-mounted display screen. A Lexus RX owner reports that “using the mouse-based system is cumbersome but manageable.” Owners like that the touchpad is easier to reach than a faraway touch screen. Lexus also won praise for easy-to-use Bluetooth audio streaming.

 


Average Systems

Nissan NissanConnect: 54 percent very satisfied
Pairing a bright screen with knobs and buttons, Nissan’s info­tainment systems are intuitive to use, with Bluetooth audio streaming that works well.

 



Infiniti Infiniti Connection: 54 percent very satisfied

Most Infiniti models are relatively long into their market cycle, which explains the dated-looking graphics of their info­tainment systems. But Connection, which combines a touch screen with a controller knob, works better than the newer, slow, and glitch-laden Infiniti InTouch system that rolled out first with the 2014 Q50 sedan. A worrisome note: The InTouch system, when separated from the overall Infiniti brand, finished dead last in our rankings—with only 38 percent very satisfied—because of its frequent software crashes and slow startup.

 


Volvo Sensus Connect: 52 percent very satisfied
Most current Volvo models use familiar-looking radio knobs and buttons to control a center screen. Winding your way through the menus isn’t intuitive or easy. The new generation of Volvo infotainment, launched with the 2016 XC90 SUV, uses a large iPad-like touch screen that requires a lot of fingertip swiping to navigate.

 


Mercedes-Benz Comand: 51 percent very satisfied
Comand pairs a center knob controller with a display screen. Earlier iterations were relatively easy to use, especially for a German luxury brand known for having complicated engineering. But though many rivals are simplifying, the latest versions of Comand have grown more complex, losing familiar knobs and buttons, and gaining a protuberant touchpad and more involved menus.

 



Subaru Starlink: 50 percent very satisfied

For years, Subaru’s infotainment systems were antiquated. Recent models finally have a modern touch-screen system combined with knobs and buttons. Although clearly improved, the new system remains decidedly average. Voice commands and Bluetooth satisfaction are average as well. Owners complained that the glossy screen “reflects bright sunlight, making it hard to see.” Many owners complained that the navigation system cannot be programmed when the car is moving.

 



Ford MyFord/MyLincoln Touch: 49 percent very satisfied
Ford was an early innovator in infotainment. But owners of MyFord Touch report reliability problems, with the system “constantly rebooting” and sometimes requiring replacement. Subsequent years have had fewer problems, but the screen design remains cluttered and unintuitive. Certain models replaced buttons and knobs with touch-sensitive flush buttons that were “overly touchy.” A 2013 Fusion owner writes, “MyFord Touch is a wonderful idea that was mostly implemented but was never really finished.” Ford is rolling out the new Sync 3 system, which responds quicker and is easier to use.

 



Mazda Mazda Connect: 49 percent very satisfied

One owner sums it up well: “Mazda still has some work left to do.” Mazda’s latest system uses a large central controller knob to select from a display screen. Another owner says, “I’m not impressed. It’s difficult to get through all of the steps to get what I want.” Owners were frustrated that the touch screen works only when the vehicle is stopped and that the voice-­recognition system often misunderstands commands. One owner complained that the Bluetooth was “incredibly flaky and crash-prone.”

 


Honda HondaLink/AcuraLink: 49 percent very satisfied
Honda and Acura info­tainment systems come in several designs, none of which make owners happy. Many were dissatisfied with voice-command quality­—the lowest-ranked among all brands. One owner found it “very difficult to use the commands because they must be said in ‘Acura-speak,’ not commonly used English words.” Our tests found the onscreen buttons and menus to be unintuitive.

 


Back to the Drawing Board

Toyota Entune: 44 percent very satisfied
Toyota’s system combines a touch screen and regular knobs and buttons, but the “whole thing is hit and miss,” one owner says. Complaints include small screens and slow system response. Voice commands often proved to be frustrating to use. The Entune app capability seems “clunky compared to phone apps.” Many respondents voiced frustration that the navigation system cannot be programmed while the car is in motion, preventing even passengers from entering a destination.

 



Cadillac Cue: 40 percent very satisfied
Owners criticize Cue for being “sluggish” and trouble-­prone, findings backed up by Consumer Reports’ reliability data. Some owners report having difficulty using Cue for months, even years, after purchase. A typical complaint: “This car REALLY needs a co-pilot with an IT degree.” Many criticisms focus on capacitive-touch buttons that are overly sensitive; one consumer noted that you “barely wave your hand in front of the Cue system and you change radio stations.”

 

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Ads Continue To Target Dads

Published: 06/21/2016  – by , Correspondent

AUBURN HILLS, Michigan — Moms are taking a backseat in a new round of commercials for the all-new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica minivan.

The ads ask the question: “What kind of man drives the Pacifica?”

The answer can be found in comedian Jim Gaffigan, a father of five and the “every man” in the campaign.

While driving his kids to soccer practice, making fast-food runs and dreaming about napping, Gaffigan extols the virtues of the Pacifica, which is on sale now at Chrysler dealerships. The campaign makes it clear the Pacifica is for dads who care about the safety and comfort of their family — even if they tend to complain a lot.

The automaker said the ads are “tongue-in-cheek,” while highlighting the various features of the Pacifica, including a long list of safety items.

The Pacifica replaces the Chrysler Town & Country minivan and targets the Honda Odyssey, Kia Sedona, Nissan Quest and Toyota Sienna.

Edmunds says: This campaign makes it clear the Pacifica is not just for soccer moms.

The 2016 Chrysler 200C

by James Lewis Jr.

Z

The Chrysler 200C underwent a full redesign last year and it proved to be the brand’s best (as of yet) midsize sedan. It has an elegant look that allows it to stand out without going overboard when competing with other midsize sedans. The 2016 Chrysler 200C that I had the pleasure of driving this week was in the Granite Crystal Metallic Clear Coat paint on the exterior of the vehicle and a Black/Deep Mocha Premium Leather-Trimmed Vented Seats on the Interior throughout the car along with Vented Seats on the both the driver and passenger seats. The Engine is a 2.4-Liter 14 MultiAir 4-Cylinder with a 9- Speed 948TE Automatic Transmission (my personal preference is the 3.6Liter V6 Engine); which translates into a 4-cylinder base and the performance when compared to others within its class is… well…decent, while that maybe it’s only shortcomings it has a lot of other features to make up for what it lacks in that department. The Base Price of the 2016 Chrysler 200C was roughly $28,000. But the one I was driving came with the Optional Equipment on it such as: the Customer Perferred Package 28N SafetyTec which consisted of Advanced Brake Assist, Rain Sensitive Windshield Wipers, Lane Departure Warning with Lane Keep Assist, Automatic High Beam Control, Full Speed FWD Collision Warning Plus Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop and Go Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection (Parallel and Perpendicular), Park Assist with Stop; to name a few. The Interior of the car was very elegant with design features such as a Luxury Door Trim Panel (the interior accents on the inside of the car was Real Wood/Bronze Chrome hue which really complimented the Black and Deep Mocha color scheme). An Auxiliary Power Outlet, Exterior Mirrors with Memory, Radio Presets/Exterior Mirrors and Driver’s Seat Memory with get this a heated 2-Tone Leather Steering Wheel that I thoroughly enjoyed given our sudden temperature drop last week! The GPS Navigation consisted of Uconnect 8.4 Inch Touch Screen Display and Sound Group consisted of the Sirius XM Travel Link with 9 Alpine Speakers with Subwoofer HD Radio Alpine 506-Watt Amplifier along with Sirius XM Traffic. The Premium Lighting Group consisted of HID Headlamps with LED Daytime Running Headlamps, LED Fog Lamps with 19”x 8” Polished Face/with Painted Pockets Aluminum Wheels with a Heavy Duty Anti-Lock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes. The Safety Features on the 2016 Chrysler 200C consisted of an Advanced Multistage Front Airbags Supplemental Front Seat Mounted Side Airbags along with a Side-Curtain Front and Rear Airbags, both the Driver’s and Passenger side had an inflatable Knee-Bolster Airbag and it also had the LATCH Ready Child Seat Anchor System. It also had the Parkview Rear Back-Up System, Remote Start System, an Assist Electric Park Brake and Electric Power Steering System along with a Keyless Enter’ n Go Security Alarm System. The interior of the car consisted of Air Conditioned Automatic Dual Zone Temperature Control.

The EPA’s Fuel Economy places the 2016 Chrysler 200C within the perimeters of 28mpg combined (based upon 23city/36highway) on the 2.4-Liter 14 MultiAir 4-Cylinder Engine. Bottom line folks, the was amongst the quietest and smoothest engines in this class that I have driven so far and it is great when merging and passing others during highway maneuvering and back road driving but truthfully when it comes to “Back Road Driving” you may ultimately prefer the 200S model. But hey, what do I know about your preferences?!

If you’re seeking a great midsize vehicle with great fuel economy and a stylish flair like no other; check out the 2016 Chrysler 200C, you will not be disappointed.

As always drive smart and safe!

The 2016 Chrysler 200C

Z

by James Lewis Jr.

The Chrysler 200C underwent a full redesign last year and it proved to be the brand’s best (as of yet) midsize sedan. It has an elegant look that allows it to stand out without going overboard when competing with other midsize sedans. The 2016 Chrysler 200C that I had the pleasure of driving this week was in the Granite Crystal Metallic Clear Coat paint on the exterior of the vehicle and a Black/Deep Mocha Premium Leather-Trimmed Vented Seats on the Interior throughout the car along with Vented Seats on the both the driver and passenger seats. The Engine is a 2.4-Liter 14 MultiAir 4-Cylinder with a 9- Speed 948TE Automatic Transmission (my personal preference is the 3.6Liter V6 Engine); which translates into a 4-cylinder base and the performance when compared to others within its class is… well…decent, while that maybe it’s only shortcomings it has a lot of other features to make up for what it lacks in that department.

The Base Price of the 2016 Chrysler 200C was roughly $28,000. But the one I was driving came with the Optional Equipment on it such as: the Customer Perferred Package 28N SafetyTec which consisted of Advanced Brake Assist, Rain Sensitive Windshield Wipers, Lane Departure Warning with Lane Keep Assist, Automatic High Beam Control, Full Speed FWD Collision Warning Plus Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop and Go Blind Spot and Cross Path Detection (Parallel and Perpendicular), Park Assist with Stop; to name a few. The Interior of the car was very elegant with design features such as a Luxury Door Trim Panel (the interior accents on the inside of the car was Real Wood/Bronze Chrome hue which really complimented the Black and Deep Mocha color scheme). An Auxiliary Power Outlet, Exterior Mirrors with Memory, Radio Presets/Exterior Mirrors and Driver’s Seat Memory with get this a heated 2-Tone Leather Steering Wheel that I thoroughly enjoyed given our sudden temperature drop last week!

The GPS Navigation consisted of Uconnect 8.4 Inch Touch Screen Display and Sound Group consisted of the Sirius XM Travel Link with 9 Alpine Speakers with Subwoofer HD Radio Alpine 506-Watt Amplifier along with Sirius XM Traffic. The Premium Lighting Group consisted of HID Headlamps with LED Daytime Running Headlamps, LED Fog Lamps with 19”x 8” Polished Face/with Painted Pockets Aluminum Wheels with a Heavy Duty Anti-Lock 4-Wheel Disc Brakes. The Safety Features on the 2016 Chrysler 200C consisted of an Advanced Multistage Front Airbags Supplemental Front Seat Mounted Side Airbags along with a Side-Curtain Front and Rear Airbags, both the Driver’s and Passenger side had an inflatable Knee-Bolster Airbag and it also had the LATCH Ready Child Seat Anchor System. It also had the Parkview Rear Back-Up System, Remote Start System, an Assist Electric Park Brake and Electric Power Steering System along with a Keyless Enter’ n Go Security Alarm System. The interior of the car consisted of Air Conditioned Automatic Dual Zone Temperature Control.

The EPA’s Fuel Economy places the 2016 Chrysler 200C within the perimeters of 28mpg combined (based upon 23city/36highway) on the 2.4-Liter 14 MultiAir 4-Cylinder Engine. Bottom line folks, the was amongst the quietest and smoothest engines in this class that I have driven so far and it is great when merging and passing others during highway maneuvering and back road driving but truthfully when it comes to “Back Road Driving” you may ultimately prefer the 200S model. But hey, what do I know about your preferences?!

If you’re seeking a great midsize vehicle with great fuel economy and a stylish flair like no other; check out the 2016 Chrysler 200C, you will not be disappointed.

As always drive smart and safe!